My System for Tracking Deep Work

Fragments from imaginary dialogues

Why do you track deep work?

Deep work is an essential component of my day. I no longer conceive of a day without deep work.

Tracking allows me to continuously optimize my work day. Deep work is actually an oscillation between work and rest. By tracking it, I can assess the quality of the oscillation at a glance.

What do you track?

You’re familiar with the Eisenhower Matrix:

Important / Urgent – Important deadlines and crises.
Important / Not Urgent – Long-term development.
Not Important / Urgent – Distractions with deadlines.
Not Important / Not Urgent – Frivolous distractions.

I track only what’s important.

How do you track it?

I have a system for it. I use math paper, a pencil, and a pen.

My system at a glance

A dot represents a pomodoro – half an hour of deep work. This is my deep-work unit.
A pencil dot represents a regular pomodoro.
A pen dot represents a high-leverage pomodoro – a pomodoro of doing the things that have the biggest impact on my life.
A circled dot represents the end of the work day – for me it’s usually around 6pm. It’s important to have a ‘shutdown complete’ ritual, as Cal Newport calls it, to close the work mental process [<link; short read]; otherwise, your mind may remain stuck in work mode.

Two separate dots represent pomodoros with a break in between. I take a 10 minute break after every pomodoro, in which I seek to move as much as possible.
Two joined dots represent pomodoros without a break in between. This is a situation I try to avoid. Whenever this happens is a sign I may have lost balance.

Four dots in a row represent a work-block. After a work-block, I take a longer break – 30+ minutes long. If a work-block exceeds four pomodoros, this is another sign I may have lost balance.
A new column indicates that I’ve taken a longer break.

That’s it. Simple and elegant.

Can you give an example?

A work day might look like this:

At the end of the day, I can tell how the day went at a glance.

11 pomodoros of deep work (5.5 hours) in total, of which 8 high-leverage pomodoros (4 hours).

I lost balance three times, two times by not taking a break between pomodoros (the joined dots), and once by exceeding four pomodoros in a row (the second column).

As an additional optimization, I started adding a small I (Input) or O (Output) next to each dot. I have a tendency to have too much input. The I and O symbols allow me to assess my input/output ratio at a glance at the end of the day.

Tags: , , , , ,

About Dani Trusca

Life-Artist, Thinker, Mover (Traceur)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: